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12 Tips For Submitting Art To Exhibitions/Galleries

In this blog, I present basic information to digest and possibly follow that will help make your artwork submission more favorable during the jurying process while alleviating the risk of being dropped before you are even given a chance. Below are some standard “Do’s” and Dont’s”.

1. FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES
Follow the rules/guidelines, it’s just that simple. If you are submitting your artwork for an exhibition, most often they have guidelines that you will need to follow to get your submission seen for consideration. (Exp: correct image size, titles, dates of work, etc.) If you don’t submit your work in the format requested, or with all the information needed you will be placed in the “deny pile” before your art is ever seen.

2. SOCIAL NETWORKING SITE NO NO’S
Do not submit your artwork through social media sites, this alone will place you in the “deny pile”. A more proper way to establish a relationship and submit a proposal or submission is to make sure it is handled through email.

3. ARE YOU HAVING THEIR BABY?
If you know the person(s) holding the exhibition unless they are your best bud of 25 years or you are having their baby, be professional and submit like everyone else. You are no more or less special since you “know” someone. Furthermore, even if you have a close relationship with a the person create a classy impression by following the same guidelines as everyone else. It shows respect and dignity.

4. NO HOUNDING
After your artwork is submitted, do not email once let alone 15 times about if you got in or not. They will most likely let you know by an “acceptance” or “denial” message or once the artists selected are chosen you will or will not be among the list. Do not hound them with repeated follow-up calls/emails/messages. That is annoying and you will be placed in the“deny pile”.

5. ATTACHMENTS CAN BE DANGEROUS
Be real careful what you are attaching to that email you’re submitting. We all have things on our computer we don’t want the general population to see, so keep it that way. A picture of Helga and Beatrice, women in their late 60’s squishing their naked, badly tattooed breasts together in front of a Budweiser sign will provide you NO such favoritism.

7. BE CONSISTENT
Be consistent. People find it hard to consider artists for exhibitions that can’t provide them with a consistent style. Try not to send a watercolor, an oil paint and then a collage when asking to share your style for consideration, as it confuses the curator in what you might provide them for the show you are submitting to. However, diversity is a good thing and so many artists can do so many things well under numerous mediums, but in the case of submissions please keep it consistent.

8. ASSUMPTIONS
Do not assume you’re accepted into an event, and promote that in which you assume on your website, FB, Twitter and/or announce it to your public when it is not even the case. This is a sure way to get denied – immediately!

9. REAL WEBSITES HELP, IT’S THE INFORMATION AGE BABY
Get a real website. A real website show professionalism. Facebook, Twitter, IG, Tumblr, Etc. are great networking tools, but they are not a replacement to a professional web site. There are free hosting and template places to help you. Here is an Article and Podcast with more information on this topic.

10. A WORD ON “NAME DROPPING”
Don’t do it. The End.

11. ONE CHANCE
You have one chance to get this right when submitting to anything, and this even includes applying for things like jobs. A first impression is very important. Artists are a dime a dozen and everyone wants to be seen. Don’t you? Don’t let your competition beat you out simply because you can’t follow directions or lack in the ability to be professional when it comes to the way you present yourself. No matter how good your artwork is, a person with artwork that might not stand to the bar next to yours technically who follows the rules, and works hard to present themselves in a professional manner could very well beat you out at the finish line.

12. CHILDREN
One last thing, don’t leave your children unattended or they might (be sold to the circus) or start writing your submissions for you or even your biography for that matter. All those spelling errors, grammar issues, slang and writing like “sweet” like “5w33t” could really make you look bad. Take back your keyboard now!

Thank you,

Aunia

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